Real Doesn’t Always Equal Pretty

When we run a film inspection on FI-16 we’re not looking for pretty. We’re looking for real.

The photographs are meant to capture the reality of what that film looks like if you held it in your hands. In really good light. So the photography software has an automatic exposure and an automatic white balance. It’s not as pretty as what you expect to see from an iPhone.

Video editors know that you can turn blacks into grays but you have a lot of trouble turning grays into black. You can dim the brightest whites but you have a lot of trouble making the brightest white out of gray. Why? Because the video editing computer doesn’t know which parts of the image are meant to be gray so they get turned to black and white also. The same is true for colors. Instead of contrast we call it saturation. But the limitations are similar.

When you’re inspecting a film on the FI-16 you see video on the computer screen. That is the actual photography shown to you. Moving at whatever speed you set the film to run. It’s not meant to be pretty, it’s meant to be accurate. So you can see what the film really looks like, what it really is.

Here’s a fun experiment. Next time you’re sitting around a table with some friends ask everyone to pull out their phones 📱. Laptops and tablets too if they have them. Then everybody play the same video on all the screens at the same time. See how different they all look!

We live in the digital age and it’s not going to unwind itself, so to speak. Manufacturers of smartphones, tablets and laptops aren’t trying to make all the videos look the same on all the screens. They’re trying to please you. They’re trying to make their screens prettier than everyone else’s. That’s not reality in video, that’s the reality of commerce.

When you’re inspecting your film, photograph its reality. Pretty comes later.