Storage Wars

I wonder why there’s no storage device or cloud storage named Pandora’s box? Moving image archivists study storage of all types. They need more of it than most people. They need more kinds of it than most people. Film in cans in cool vaults. Digital storage of every conceivable type and price point. And they’re not just thinking about storage for convenient retrieval, some of them are thinking about storage for centuries and beyond.

There’s no single right answer and even if there was, it would change by the time this blog post reaches your eyes. But I can tell you a few things about what we are throwing into the mix.

FI-16, our film inspection device, has some storage inside of it. Not a lot, just enough to capture the photographs it takes of your films. That is stored in non-volatile RAM, about a terabyte of it. After a few hours of film inspection you’ll want to move those photographs and the video workprints that FI-16 makes from them onto their next storage.

Waypoint, our film inspection computer vision and condition reporting online tool set, is hosted on Amazon Web Services. Waypoint only needs the photographs long enough to analyze them with computer vision. So that leaves a lot of options to the user.

You could connect your FI-16 to the internet and upload the photographs and video workprints directly to Waypoint. Waypoint makes more video workprints to illustrate the film condition on a frame-by-frame basis. We’ll keep those for you on Waypoint along with the inspection data that Waypoint makes for you.

You can download all of that to your own storage. You can copy it to some other cloud storage if you like. Just do that thing you do.

Or you could connect your FI-16 to your local area network and move the photographs and video workprints there first. We have an uploader program that you can install on your own server to copy the photographs to Waypoint over the internet.

After Waypoint has analyzed the photographs you could pay us or Amazon to store them very cheaply in Amazon Glacier. Or not, that’s up to you.

How many copies do you need? You could take the belts and suspenders approach and keep all the copies ever made. You could take the efficiency and preservation approach and keep the photographs and video workprints where you keep all your other digital files and backups.

Sorry for opening Pandora’s box but moving image activists are used to it by now. All we can do is make it easy, reliable, auditable, efficient, and as fast and cheap as possible without giving up those values.

And we will keep staring into Pandora’s box for as long as you do. Film inspection and moving image preservation and access is a long game. In fact I would say it’s an infinite game, the kind that gets better the longer you play.